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Tips & Tricks: Primary Reimbursement

March 1st, 2017 by Katherine Moller

So, in my last blog I talked about how financial advice can carry over into the music world.  This month I wanted to continue with this theme.

Retirement Planning

Primary Reimbursement – you probably know this more as “Pay Yourself First” Which means exactly how it sounds. It is the habit of paying yourself (your savings, retirement goals, etc.) first – instead of saving money after everything else has been paid.  This can be accomplished by viewing the act of putting money into your savings accounts as one of your bills.

Well, I believe in the same thing when it comes to practicing!

I am a junkie for both financial advice and time management advice!  There are many time management blogs that talk about how if  there is something that you want to ensure that you accomplish in your day, that you should do it first.  I agree with that in music as well.  I have recently rescheduled my days so that the first thing in the morning I do is walk for 30 minutes followed by practicing.  I do both of these things right away in the morning because they are both things that I might put off later in the day.  No matter what happens later, I have accomplished two important things in my day, and that always makes me feel good!

Antique clock and old violin over vintage wooden table

Not only do I work this financial advice into my daily schedule, but I also incorporate it into each practice session.  I like to warm up and then dive right into whatever it is that I hate practicing or whatever I am struggling with.  That way I don’t put it off and then run out of time.

I don’t dislike either practicing or walking, but I can’t say that I always love those activities either.  By front-loading my day, I know I will get it done!

I hope that you will schedule your days so that you accomplish your main goals!  Happy fiddling!

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''Celtic fiddle with a classical twist:
the heart and soul of afiddler, the artistry and finesse of a classical violinist.''